Health

Athletes develop skin rashes and fever after the Tough Mudder race

California health officials have issued an alert after several people who competed in a Tough Mudder race last weekend fell ill.

According to the Sonoma County Department of Health Services, nearly two dozen people who competed in the Tough Mudder Challenge at Sonoma Raceway on August 19 and 20 developed rashes with fever and reported muscle aches or nausea and vomiting.

“During the Tough Mudder race, the skin was exposed to intense mud. Most of those affected experienced pustular rashes, fever, myalgia and headaches,” health officials said. “These symptoms could indicate a mild illness called swimmer’s eczema, but they can also indicate a staph infection or another more serious bacterial infection such as Aeromonas.”

CDC RECOMMENDATIONS for flu shots: “Vaccination should continue throughout the season.”

Close-up of an arm with a rash

Sonoma County health officials issued an alert about multiple cases of possible infection following a Tough Mudder competition at Sonoma Raceway last weekend. (Courtesy of KTVU)

Athletes participating in the race crawled through mud and water and climbed over and under obstacles such as a barbed wire fence. Several participants posted on social media about their condition after the race, complaining of a red rash with pus, fever and body aches.

“There were red marks everywhere on my body that touched the ground,” contestant Chris Palakos told local FOX affiliate KTVU.

BIDEN was booed by onlookers while speaking to the press in Lake Tahoe, California

The man's legs are covered with a rash

Athletes shared photos on social media of angry red rashes they got after the Tough Mudders challenge on August 19-20. (Courtesy of KTVU)

Tough Mudder contestants shared pictures of their breakouts with KTVU. The images show her arms and legs covered with infectious wounds.

At least 22 people contacted the Sonoma County Health Department to report rashes, interim health commissioner Dr. Karen Smith. Officials believe the people likely contracted a bacterial infection called Aeromonas, a bacterium that lives in water and gets infected through open wounds. It’s not contagious.

Florida officials have reported five deaths from “flesh-eating” bacteria in Tampa Bay since January

A man's arm was covered with a rash

“During the Tough Mudder race, the skin was exposed to intense mud. Most of those affected suffered from pustular rashes, fever, myalgia and headaches. These symptoms could indicate a mild illness called swimmer’s eczema, but they can also indicate a staph infection or other more serious bacterial infection such as Aeromonas,” health officials warned. (Courtesy of KTVU)

“We definitely want to let people know… If you attended this event and you have a rash, fever or pain, we want you to see your doctor,” she told KTVU.

Smith said one person who saw an infectious disease specialist tested positive for Aeromonas bacteria. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the infection is often misdiagnosed as staph infection or swimmer’s eczema — a rash caused by an allergic reaction to certain microscopic parasites that infect some birds and animals.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“We want doctors to have the right information so they know what things to consider, including staph,” Smith told KTVU. “But we don’t want that to happen because it looks like staph. We don’t want them to just treat staph and then find out it’s something else.”

Sonoma County health officials urged anyone who participated in the race and later developed a rash to see a doctor or, if they do not have a medical provider, to contact the local emergency room.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button