Sports

Derrick Henry, who won the Heisman Trophy at Alabama, reveals Nick Saban’s hilarious upset

Nick Saban’s departure from college football after his legendary career, particularly with the Alabama Crimson Tide, has caused many to reflect on his years in football.

The latest story comes from one of his former running backs, Baltimore Ravens star Derrick Henry, who shared some funny stories about his old coach.

Henry joined “The Pivot” along with former NFL players Ryan Clark, Channing Crowder and Fred Taylor, where he said that “Old School” Saban had pet peeves that everyone who played for him knew about.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM

Nick Saban looks from the podium

Alabama Crimson Tide coach Nick Saban speaks to reporters outside the West Wing of the White House on March 2, 2016. (Cheriss May/NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

“He couldn’t stand it when someone scored a goal and then wanted to celebrate,” he said.

Henry realized this during a team meeting at Alabama.

“We were in a meeting after a game – I forgot who we played,” Henry recalled. “He pulled up the film and showed everyone. He’s talking about, ‘Guys, stop all this showboating, all these praying hands and pretending to thank God. Then later that evening, at 12 o’clock, you’ll be down.’ There, have Black & Milds, have alcohol. You hunt (girl). Forget all that.”

NICK SABAN REVEALS CONVERSATION WITH WIFE TERRY THAT CONTRIBUTES TO RETIREMENT: “WHY DO WE DO THIS?”

It’s no secret that Saban was a no-nonsense, old-school coach. His style got results and he didn’t want to change that.

Over the years, clips have surfaced of him at practice yelling at future NFL stars.

After his surprise resignation, Saban revealed a conversation with his wife Terry that led him to leave the game.

Nick Saban trains in the CFP

Alabama head coach Nick Saban reacts after running back Jase McClellan scored a touchdown during the second half of the Rose Bowl CFP NCAA semifinal game against Michigan on January 1, 2024 in Pasadena, California. (AP Photo/Kyusung Gong, File)

“All the things I believed in all those years — 50 years of coaching — no longer exist in college athletics,” Saban said during a panel discussion in Washington, D.C. with Texas Senator Ted Cruz. Cruz had asked whether the “current chaos” in college sports, particularly regarding NIL deals and the transfer portal, led to his resignation.

“It’s always been about developing players and helping people be more successful in life,” Saban added.

“My wife even said to me – we have all the recruits together with their parents for breakfast on Sunday. She always met with the mothers and talked about how she would help her sons and how well they would be taken care of.” . She came to me right before I retired and said, “Why are we doing this?” I said, “What do you mean?” She said, “All they care about is how much you pay them. They don’t care how you develop them, which is what we’ve always done. So why are you doing this?”‘

“For me it was something of a warning sign that we are really creating circumstances here that are not good for young people, which is why I always did what I did. My father did it, I did it. So that’s why. “That’s why I always like college athletics more than the NFL because you had the opportunity to develop young people.”

Derrick Henry and Nick Saban pose with the Heisman Trophy

University of Alabama running back Derrick Henry and University of Alabama head coach Nick Saban pose with the Heisman Trophy at a press conference following the 81st Annual Heisman Awards Ceremony in New York City. (Rich Graessle/Icon Sportswire/Corbis/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Saban already has a new job in college football. ESPN announced he would be joining its ranks. Saban, who owns the most national titles of any college football head coach in history, will be featured on College GameDay and other programs next season.

Henry was the 2015 Heisman Trophy winner while playing for Saban. He also helped the Crimson Tide defeat Clemson in the 2016 national championship game, rushing for 158 yards and three touchdowns.

Follow Fox News Digital Sports coverage of Xand subscribe the Fox News Sports Huddle newsletter.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button