Health

Study Shows Gender-Specific Warning Signs of Cardiac Arrest: “New Paradigm for Prevention”

Half of those who suffer a cardiac arrest According to a study recently published in the journal The Lancet Digital Health, people experience a meaningful symptom 24 hours before the incident.

This warning symptom was different in men and women, researchers at the Smidt Heart Institute found; The Institute is located at Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

In women, shortness of breath was the symptom that preceded impending illness cardiac arrestwhile in men, chest pain was the main complaint.

Cutting out salt can reduce risk of heart disease by nearly 20%, study says: ‘Know What You’re Eating’

Sweating and seizure-like activity occurred in smaller subgroups of both sexes, the researchers found.

Out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest has a 90% mortality rate, according to a press release from Cedars Sinai – so it’s important to recognize early warning signs.

Chest pains in a man and a woman

According to a recent study published in the journal The Lancet Digital Health, half of people who experience cardiac arrest experience a meaningful symptom 24 hours before the event. (iStock)

“Using warning symptoms to conduct effective triage for those who need to make an emergency call could lead to early intervention and prevention of impending death,” said Dr. Sumeet Chugh, director of the Center for Cardiac Arrest Prevention at the Smidt Heart Institute, wrote the press release.

“Our findings could lead to a new paradigm for preventing sudden cardiac death,” added Chugh, the study’s lead author.

DAILY ASPIRIN AFTER A HEART ATTACK CAN REDUCE RISK OF FUTURE EVENTS, STUDY DISCOVER

To determine how best to predict sudden cardiac arrest, Chugh’s research team collected community-based data from the ongoing PRESTO study (Prediction of Sudden Death in Multi-Ethnic Communities) in Ventura County, Californiaand the Oregon Sudden Unexpected Death Study (SUDS) in Portland, Oregon, the press release said.

Researchers looked at individual symptoms and groups of symptoms that occurred before the sudden cardiac arrest, and then compared those results to control groups who also sought emergency medical care.

woman out of breath

A new study found that shortness of breath was the most telling symptom of impending cardiac arrest in women. (iStock)

“It takes a village to do this work,” Chugh said in the press release. “We initiated the SUDS study 22 years ago and the PRESTO study eight years ago. These cohorts have provided invaluable insights along the way.”

“Importantly, this work would not have been possible without the partnership and support of first responders, medical examiners and the hospital systems provide the care within these communities,” he added.

BRAZILIAN STUDY: ‘LAUGHTER THERAPY’ REDUCES RISK OF HEART DISEASE: ‘EXCITING TO SEE’

The PRESTO study showed that 50% of the 823 people – all of whom had experienced a sudden cardiac arrest observed by a bystander or an emergency medical professional – had at least one tell-tale symptom prior to their fatal incident.

The SUDS study showed similar results.

Pain in a man's chest

Chest pain was the number one complaint in men before impending cardiac arrest. (iStock)

“This is the first community-based study to assess the association of warning symptoms — or groups of symptoms — with an impending sudden cardiac arrest using a comparison group of emergency medical service-documented symptoms recorded as part of routine emergency care,” said Eduardo Marbán, MD, PhD , executive director of the Smidt Heart Institute, said in the press release.

“Early intervention can make a significant difference in outcomes.”

These results pave the way for further research studies to better predict an imminent sudden cardiac arrest, the researchers said.

“Next, we will complement these key gender-specific warning signs with additional capabilities — such as clinical profiles and biometric measurements — to improve prediction of sudden cardiac arrest,” Chugh said.

ASK A DOCTOR: “HOW CAN I PREVENT HIGH CHOLESTEROL?”

A cardiologist who was not involved in the study agreed that this new research highlights findings that may help early detection and prevention of sudden cardiac arrest.

“Identifying specific symptoms that precede such a critical event, and particularly considering the gender differences in these symptoms, has important public health implications,” says Dr. Allen Jeremiah, MD, Associate Director of the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory at St. Francis Hospital & Heart Center am Long Island, New Yorksaid Fox News Digital.

Heart attack

“Symptoms of a heart attack or cardiac arrest aren’t always the stereotypical chest pain commonly associated with men,” a cardiologist told Fox News Digital. (iStock)

“If these findings can be translated into clinical practice, they could lead to better patient outcomes by enabling timely interventions and medical care.”

Jeremias also emphasized that the results of the study on gender differences in heart symptoms are crucial for both healthcare professionals and patients.

HEART REMEDY THAT COMBINES 3 DRUGS IN ONE WILL BE ADDED TO THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION’S ESSENTIAL DRUG LIST

“[The study] emphasizes that heart-related symptoms may present differently in men and women, which may affect how patients and physicians perceive and respond to these symptoms,” the doctor said.

“Managing risk factors is critical to heart health and prevention.”

“It is important to educate patients about these differences and to emphasize that the symptoms of a heart attack or cardiac arrest are not always the stereotypical chest pain that is common.” associated with men‘ Jeremiah continued.

cardiac ultrasound

“It’s important to see a doctor immediately if symptoms appear, regardless of whether they correspond to stereotypical heart attack symptoms,” the cardiologist said. (iStock)

The cardiologist also said it’s important for patients, regardless of gender, to be aware of a wide range of potential warning signs and that they should see a doctor if they experience any unusual or persistent symptoms.

CLICK HERE TO SUBSCRIBE TO OUR HEALTH NEWSLETTER

Beyond understanding the symptoms, Jeremiah pointed out that patients should be educated on the risk factors for heart disease such as family history, smoking, etc. high blood pressurehigh cholesterol, obesity and a sedentary lifestyle.

“Managing these risk factors is critical to heart health and prevention,” he said.

picture of the heart

“Our findings could lead to a new paradigm for preventing sudden cardiac death,” noted the study’s senior author. (iStock)

Because every patient is unique, not all individuals experience the same symptoms — and some may not be typical, Jeremias pointed out.

Healthcare providers should take a comprehensive approach when evaluating patients, taking into account their medical history, risk factors and individual symptoms, the cardiologist said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“It’s important to see a doctor immediately if symptoms appear, regardless of whether they correspond to stereotypical heart attack symptoms,” added Jeremias.

“Early intervention can make a significant difference in outcomes.”

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button