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An Ohio family left home with broken bones after a tornado ripped through their home and threw their daughter 50 feet

An Ohio mother suffered severe bruising and her daughter broke both ankles after an EF3 tornado ripped through their home.

Amanda Gear was thrown through her home on March 15 when 150 mph winds ripped apart her Columbus-area mobile home, leaving her with two black eyes, deep bruises and broken bones in her face.

Her daughter, Caylie Short, 15, broke both ankles after she was thrown 50 feet from her trailer onto State Route 33.

“I remember my mother. I heard my mother screaming, looked up and was on a street. Caylie told WWNYTV. “I did not know it. I looked around and didn’t know where it was.”

Short was hiding under her mattress when her mother started screaming. As she looked out, the house began to collapse around her.

Amanda Gear (left) was thrown through her home on March 15 when 150 mph winds ripped apart her Columbus home, leaving her with two black eyes, deep bruises and broken bones in her face. gofundme/amanda-and-caylie-tornado-relief

“I went to the wall where our back door is and then to the ceiling,” she told the local outlet.

Gear found her daughter on Route 33, unable to move her legs or walk. According to WWNYTV, Short had broken the same bone in both ankles and one was sticking out.

She also suffered a minor broken collarbone and multiple cuts and bone injuries, a family friend said in a GoFundMe fundraiser.

Her daughter, Caylie Short, 15, broke both ankles after she was thrown 50 feet from her trailer onto State Route 33. Facebook/Caylie Short
Short was hiding under her mattress when her mother started screaming. As she looked out, the house began to collapse around her. Gear found her daughter on Route 33, unable to move her legs or walk. Short had broken the same bone in each ankle, and one of them was sticking out.

She was taken to Mary Rutan Hospital before being transferred to Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, where she underwent surgery.

Short’s stepfather, Brian Scurlock, was at work when the tornado struck and rushed to the hospital to see Short.

“The first thing I did when I got to the hospital was go up to her, hug her and just cry,” Scurlock told WWNYTV. “I told her I was glad she made it and that I would be there for her.”

Gear herself recalled her experience in the middle of the tornado, saying she remembered “looking up” and it “looked like it was daylight.”

Gear herself recalled her experience in the middle of the tornado, saying she remembered “looking up” and it “looked like it was daylight.”
While Short remains in the hospital, the family tries to figure out what to do next after their home is destroyed. Doral Chenoweth/The Columbus Dispatch/USA TODAY NETWORK

While Short remains in the hospital, the family tries to figure out what to do next after their home is destroyed.

“I will never take a tornado siren lightly again,” Scurlock said.

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