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One in five teachers have been BEATED by students this year, a report says – and it claims children’s behavior has worsened since Covid because parents have become “less tolerant” and “lost respect for school rules” would have.

One in five teachers have been attacked by students this year amid claims children’s behavior has become more violent since the pandemic.

Spitting, cursing, fighting, pushing and throwing chairs were among the things that were more common in schools across the country, according to a new survey.

The ones from the BBC, surveyed 9,000 teachers in England about their experiences dealing with behavior in the classroom – and a higher proportion reported violent behavior compared to two years ago.

The impact of Covid lockdowns has long been blamed for changing attitudes. One boss claimed parents were “less tolerant” than before the pandemic, “and that communicates that to students too”.

Research this year also found that the number of suspensions had doubled in six years, with parents accused of having a “lack of respect for school rules”.

Supply teacher Lorraine Meah, who has worked in the profession for 35 years, reported seeing children as young as three to four years old “spitting and cursing”.

However, she admitted the worst behavior came from five and six-year-olds with “dangerous tendencies” such as throwing chairs.

She told the BBC: “In your class there will be three or four children exhibiting challenging behaviour. “That’s hard to manage when you have a class of 30.”

Fifteen percent of teachers also said they had been sexually harassed by a student.

Teachers reported that spitting, cursing, arguing, pushing and throwing chairs were among the more common occurrences in schools across the country. In the picture: Two students fight in the schoolyard (archive photo)

Teachers reported that spitting, cursing, arguing, pushing and throwing chairs were among the more common occurrences in schools across the country. In the picture: Two students fight in the schoolyard (archive photo)

But Nick Hurn, chief executive of the Bishop Wilkinson Catholic Education Trust, which has schools in Durham, Sunderland Gateshead and Northumberland, said last year that only a small minority were causing problems.

He said both children and parents had become “far less tolerant” since Covid.

He said The guard in November: “So you’re seeing slightly more unpleasant behavior from more children than before.” “If they’ve seen that the parents have no respect for the school rules, why should they do that?”

Zac Copley, who worked as a substitute teacher for a year, told the BBC it sometimes felt like a “never-ending battle” to get students’ behavior under control.

He recalled having to tear children apart when they fought with each other as displays were “ripped off the wall.”

Have you experienced abuse from students? Email megan.howe@mailonline.co.uk

A graphic showing how student behavior in English schools is deteriorating, according to a BBC survey

A graphic showing how student behavior in English schools is deteriorating, according to a BBC survey

He once said a student who had been sent out of class tried to break back in with a cricket bat.

The survey, commissioned by Teacher Tapp, found that 30 per cent of teachers had experienced an argument in the week they responded to the BBC’s questions.

Two out of five teachers reported observing some form of aggressive behavior that required intervention within a week.

Dr. Patrick Roach, general secretary of the NASWUT union, told the BBC that the rise in abuse in schools was due to “cuts in behavioral and mental health professionals”, which had led to teachers trying to “fill in the gaps close,” which required the input of professionals such as a counselor or therapist.

MailOnline revealed on Tuesday that “terrified” teachers locked classrooms to keep violent students away.

A school teacher in Tower Hamlets, where recent data showed children were suspended for using knives, screwdrivers and even an air gun, told MailOnline: “The working environment can often be challenging.”

“I often deal with difficult students who don’t seem to want to learn at all.” “Some can be quite aggressive, which makes safety a big issue.”

Karl Mackey (pictured), principal of St John Fisher Catholic Academy in Dewsbury, has worked hard to improve their behavior after it was rated “inadequate” by Ofsted in 2022

Karl Mackey (pictured), principal of St John Fisher Catholic Academy in Dewsbury, has worked hard to improve their behavior after it was rated “inadequate” by Ofsted in 2022

Teachers were forced to lock the doors to their classrooms for fear of keeping aggressive students away

Teachers were forced to lock the doors to their classrooms for fear of keeping aggressive students away

Research by consultancy Public First found a “seismic shift” in parents’ attitudes towards schooling, with pandemic-related closures and teacher strikes damaging the social contract between schools and families.

Plus, more children are being homeschooled than ever before. Official figures from last year showed that 86,000 children were home-schooled in one day in England last year – and 116,300 were home-schooled full-time. Both are sharp increases of up to 50 percent compared to pre-pandemic levels.

Rachel Clark, who has a 15-year-old daughter, recently withdrew her from mainstream education because she said the system was “not fit for purpose”.

She told MailOnline: “The rise in behavior problems since Covid is a symptom of what the Government has done in education, but it is determined to blame children.” More and more pressure is building, focusing on results rather than the process concentrate and turn schools into sweatshops. When children then react to this pressure and punish them.

“The rise in homeschooling is not due to irresponsible parents who think school is optional, but rather to professional, well-educated parents who believe that the education system is not fit for purpose and that these children change when they leave that environment.”

“I’m sick of the government blaming Covid, children, parents and teachers for anything but this.”

St John Fisher Catholic Academy in Dewsbury has worked hard to improve its behavior after being rated “inadequate” by Ofsted in 2022.

Karl Mackey, the school’s fifth headteacher in six years, told the BBC that there was a “culture of bullying and intimidation” at the school that needed to be stamped out.

Debra de Muschamp (pictured) from the school principals' union told the BBC some teachers were left

Debra de Muschamp (pictured) from the school principals’ union told the BBC some teachers were left “shocked, frightened and isolated”.

Under Mr Mackey’s leadership, cell phones have been banned and there are strict rules about using the toilet during class.

Creative subjects such as theater, dance and music were also included.

Mr Mackey continued that parents and the wider community had noticed a change in students’ behaviour.

He said: “This year you will see them in class every day, not late, in perfect uniform, doing their best.”

During the pandemic, the Department for Education launched a £10 million behavior hub program to give schools struggling with student behavior the opportunity to work with others to offer advice and support. However, the program is set to expire this year.

One in five respondents also said they had been abused online or verbally by parents. NAHT said teachers reported having their tires slashed and being physically attacked.

Speaking to the BBC, Debra de Muschamp said some teachers had felt “shocked, scared and isolated” and said: “Enough is enough.”

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