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What happened to the homes of these serial killers, from Lucy Letby to Dennis Nilsen’s £1.48million hideout?

When the heinous crimes of serial killers are uncovered, attention inevitably turns to their private and personal lives as people desperately try to uncover what drove them to commit such horrific acts.

When nurse Lucy Letby was handed an unprecedented 14-life sentence this week for killing seven babies, photos of her childhood home filled with teddy bears, cliche motifs and fairy lights have resurfaced.

There, investigators found key evidence, including her diary, hospital documents, and post-it notes, including one that read, ‘I AM EVIL.’ I DID THIS.’

MailOnline exclusively revealed how a technician acquired the £180,000 two-bedroom semi-detached house.

While some serial killers’ hideouts were leveled, others were sold for lucrative sums.

Here we look at what happened to the other houses where the unthinkable happened; From the estate where six children were murdered in their sleep by their parents in a botched arson attack, to the home where notorious necrophile Dennis Nilsen buried the bodies of his 12 murder victims.

Photos of Lucy Letby's messy bedroom were released after her sentencing. A canvas on the wall bears the slogan:

Photos of Lucy Letby’s messy bedroom were released after her sentencing. A canvas on the wall bears the slogan: “Leave glitter wherever you go”

The 33-year-old nurse was one of just four women sentenced to life in prison on Monday

The 33-year-old nurse was one of just four women sentenced to life in prison on Monday

Dennis Nilsen, the Muswell Hill killer, killed 12 or 13 men at the north London estate after luring them back to his flat

Dennis Nilsen, the Muswell Hill killer, killed 12 or 13 men at the north London estate after luring them back to his flat

Nilsen's Cricklewood estate at 195 Melrose Avenue (pictured) is being converted into a £1.48million six-bed home

Nilsen’s Cricklewood estate at 195 Melrose Avenue (pictured) is being converted into a £1.48million six-bed home

Dennis Nilsen, known as the Muswell Hill Murderer, died at HMP Full Sutton in 2018 at the age of 74, 34 years after serving his life sentence for an assassination attempt in the late 1970s and early 1980s.

Nilsen, one of the country’s most notorious killers, is believed to have killed up to 15 gay men, most of them homeless, at his homes in Cricklewood and Muswell Hill, north London.

Earlier this year, news broke that his former Cricklewood home at 195 Melrose Avenue — where he stored bodies under the floorboards — would be converted into a single-family home.

Brent Council gave permission to its owners, who bought the two-bedroom flat in 2016 for £493,000, to convert it from two self-contained flats into a six-bedroom family home.

The area where the serial killer dismembered bodies on flagstones now houses a study, with bedrooms directly above and to the side.

Other apartments along the road have recently been sold for up to £1,075,000. The latest complete estate on the street has sold for £1,480,000.

Nilsen first moved into the Cricklewood flat in 1975 with his then-boyfriend, who left him shortly thereafter.

During his killing spree, Nilsen befriended his vulnerable subjects in pubs and bars around London before luring them into his flat with promises of alcohol and shelter.

More than 1,000 teeth and bone fragments were found by police in the property’s garden and in a field behind the house.

Nilsen (pictured) - who died aged 72 - cooked his victims and stored their bodies under the floorboards

Nilsen (pictured) – who died aged 72 – cooked his victims and stored their bodies under the floorboards

He killed 12 or 13 men at the north London property after luring them back to his flat (pictured in 1983)

Most of his victims were homosexual or homeless men whom he picked up in bars across London or on the streets. Pictured: Police in the yard at 195 Melrose Avenue in 1983 before the ditch

Most of his victims were homosexual or homeless men whom he picked up in bars across London or on the streets. Pictured: Police in the yard at 195 Melrose Avenue in 1983 before the ditch

Sieves were taken to the back yard of 195 Melrose Avenue in 1983 while police were looking for remains

Sieves were taken to the back yard of 195 Melrose Avenue in 1983 while police were looking for remains

More than 1,000 teeth and bone fragments were found by police in the property's garden and in a field behind the house

More than 1,000 teeth and bone fragments were found by police in the property’s garden and in a field behind the house

Nilsen usually strangled his victims - often with ties - before chopping them up and burning them in his garden

Nilsen usually strangled his victims – often with ties – before chopping them up and burning them in his garden

The house was bought by a Portuguese NHS manager and his French-born partner in 2016 for £493,000. Pictured is the Cricklewood apartment after renovation

The house was bought by a Portuguese NHS manager and his French-born partner in 2016 for £493,000. Pictured is the Cricklewood apartment after renovation

In 2018, a couple revealed how they turned the Cricklewood apartment (pictured) into their dream home - stressing that they weren't put off by the gory history and are proud of how they turned the 'house of horrors' into one comfortable place to stay

In 2018, a couple revealed how they turned the Cricklewood apartment (pictured) into their dream home – stressing that they weren’t put off by the gory history and are proud of how they turned the ‘house of horrors’ into one comfortable place to stay

The job center worker and former police officer was finally arrested in 1983 after clogging drains with parts of his victims that he had flushed down the toilet.

Seemingly without risk, Nilsen brazenly complained to a waste disposal company about the blockage and demanded that it be resolved, since he and other residents were suffering as a result.

Nilsen murdered his victims and sat by their corpses before dismembering them – earning him the nickname “the kind killer” because he believed his methods were humane.

He would also take a few baths and sleep in bed next to them.

After his arrest, he told police how he boiled his victims’ heads in a large saucepan to dispose of their brains.

Hindley and Bradys The first murder occurred in July 1963 when they murdered 16-year-old Pauline Reade after convincing her to get into her car.

They then kidnapped and killed four more children before burying their bodies on Saddleworth Moor. Keith Bennett, 12, is the only victim whose remains have not yet been found.

Moors killers Ian Brady (pictured) and Myra Hindley killed five children in Manchester in the early 1960s

Moors killers Ian Brady (pictured) and Myra Hindley killed five children in Manchester in the early 1960s

Hindley helped Brady murder five children and was sentenced to life in prison in 1966

Hindley helped Brady murder five children and was sentenced to life in prison in 1966

The home of Ian Brady and Myra Hindley on Wardle Brook Avenue in Hattersley

The home of Ian Brady and Myra Hindley on Wardle Brook Avenue in Hattersley

Keith Bennett, 12, was kidnapped and murdered by Ian Brady in 1964 but his body was never found

Keith Bennett, 12, was kidnapped and murdered by Ian Brady in 1964 but his body was never found

The couple were imprisoned for three murders in 1966. They later confessed to two more murders before Hindley died in prison in 2002 at the age of 60. Brady passed away in 2017.

12-year-old John Kilbride was the couple’s second murder after he was abducted from Ashton market on Saturday 23 November 1963. He was strangled and buried in a shallow grave. He was the second of Brady and Hindley’s five victims.

Lesley Ann Downey, 10, disappeared on Boxing Day. She had been kidnapped from the carnival and taken back to Hindley’s house. She was brutally assaulted and the ordeal was caught on tape.

Edward Evans, 17, was the last victim of the ailing duo. He had just been to Manchester United when Brady lured Edward. Brady repeatedly hit Evans with an ax

Brady and Hindley murdered at least two of their victims in this “house of horrors” in Hyde, west of Manchester.

In December 1965, police searched Brady and Hindley’s housing estate after Edward Evans was killed. The house was demolished in the 1980s after a number of potential tenants refused to move in

Mick Philpott - who killed six of his children by burning his house on fire while they slept - pictured alongside his wife

Mick Philpott – who killed six of his children by burning his house on fire while they slept – pictured alongside his wife

Mick, previously in prison for stabbing his schoolgirl lover 27 times, weaves a web of lies to get away with the crime. Pictured: The aftermath of the fire

Mick, previously in prison for stabbing his schoolgirl lover 27 times, weaves a web of lies to get away with the crime. Pictured: The aftermath of the fire

Mick's intention was to rescue the sleeping children through an upstairs window (the house pictured) but things went disastrously wrong and the youngsters all died from smoke inhalation

Mick’s intention was to rescue the sleeping children through an upstairs window (the house pictured) but things went disastrously wrong and the youngsters all died from smoke inhalation

Mick Philpott, 58, and his wife Mairead, 34, were sent to prison in April 2013 after their children were killed as they slept in the fire at their cramped three-bedroom house in May 2012.

Along with boyfriend Paul Mosley, they burned down their home in Victory Road, Allenton, Derby, to get a larger community center – but it backfired when the property was engulfed in a fireball and the six children trapped upstairs.

They had hatched an elaborate conspiracy in which Mick would save the children and blame the fire on his estranged partner, Lisa Willis.

but tToo much gas was used and the fire got out of control – leaving Philpott unable to reach the children in temperatures hovering around 1,000F.

Jade Philpott, 10, and her brothers Duwayne, 13, John, nine, Jack, eight, Jesse, six, and Jayden, five, died from complications from smoke inhalation after the fire.

In the days following the fire, Philpott began an elaborate ruse to appear innocent, even appearing at a press conference to solicit information.

He “loved” being a local celebrity and was seen “laughing and joking” and “mending” his wife at the hospital where their son Duwayne was dying after the fire

The couple's six children - Duwayne, 13, Jade, 10, John, 9, Jack, 7, Jesse, 6, and Jayden, 5 - died from smoke inhalation as a result of the fire

The couple’s six children – Duwayne, 13, Jade, 10, John, 9, Jack, 7, Jesse, 6, and Jayden, 5 – died from smoke inhalation as a result of the fire

The horrifying scene at the property where the fire broke out, killing six children

The horrifying scene at the property where the fire broke out, killing six children

Construction workers begin demolition of the semi-detached house at 18 Victory Road where six children died in a fire

Construction workers begin demolition of the semi-detached house at 18 Victory Road where six children died in a fire

The trio were found guilty of manslaughter in April 2013 and Philpott was sentenced to life in prison with a minimum of 15 years after being branded a “disturbingly dangerous man with no moral compass”.

The judge described the conspiracy as “an evil and dangerous plan” which is “beyond the comprehension of any reasonable person”.

While in custody awaiting trial, he wrote a sick note boasting that he and his wife would rape each other if he won his freedom.

In 2013, the property at 18 Victory Road was demolished almost two years after the children’s deaths.

Ian Huntley’s home in Sohan, where he murdered schoolgirls Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman, was also demolished in 2004.

While the case was still ongoing, police tore down the house, dubbed the “house of horrors,” to look for evidence.

However, Huntley left the house immaculate, meaning police found no blood, hair, or fingerprints from any of the girls in the house.

Police then decided to demolish it with a 20-ton bulldozer to prevent it from becoming a permanent memorial to her death.

Notorious serial killer Ian Huntley is pictured on police tape

Notorious serial killer Ian Huntley is pictured on police tape

A police officer stands outside the home of Ian Huntley and Maxine Carr in Soham

A police officer stands outside the home of Ian Huntley and Maxine Carr in Soham

Pictured: Huntley's kitchen leading to the dining room

Pictured: Huntley’s kitchen leading to the dining room

A police handover of Ian Huntley's dining room area from Cambridgeshire

A police handover of Ian Huntley’s dining room area from Cambridgeshire

The master bedroom in killer Ian Huntley's home in Soham

The master bedroom in killer Ian Huntley’s home in Soham

The staircase of the so-called

The staircase of the so-called “House of Secrets”

Workers demolish the home of former Soham Village College caretaker and convicted child killer Ian Huntley

Workers demolish the home of former Soham Village College caretaker and convicted child killer Ian Huntley

Huntley was sentenced to two life terms in November 2003 for the murders of local schoolgirls Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman at the Old Bailey

Huntley was sentenced to two life terms in November 2003 for the murders of local schoolgirls Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman at the Old Bailey

Doctor Harold Shipman, a general practitioner, killed an estimated 250 patients with the drug diamorphine over a 27-year period dating back to 1971.

Around 80 percent of his victims were older women, his youngest victim being a 41-year-old man.

Shipman was convicted of drug offenses in 1976 after becoming addicted to pethidine as a young doctor. However, the General Medical Council (GMC) allowed him to continue practicing.

He began his killing spree at Pontefract General in the early 1970s and was eventually arrested in September 1998 at the age of 52 and sentenced to life imprisonment in January 2000.

He was convicted at Preston Crown Court of murdering 15 elderly women: Marie West, Irene Turner, Lizzie Adams, Jean Lilley, Ivy Lomas, Muriel Grimshaw, Marie Quinn, Kathleen Wagstaff, Bianka Pomfret, Norah Nuttall, Pamela Hillier and Maureen Ward, Winifred Mellor, Joan Melia and Kathleen Grundy.

dr Harold Shipman used his position as the family doctor to murder an estimated 250 patients

dr Harold Shipman used his position as the family doctor to murder an estimated 250 patients

The house of dr. Harold Shipman in Mottram, Greater Manchester

The house of dr. Harold Shipman in Mottram, Greater Manchester

Ten days after his life sentence and four-year prison sentence for forgery, the GMC struck Shipman off the register.

An inquest was launched a year after his conviction and concluded that the GP had killed at least 215 of his patients between 1975 and 1998, during which time he also worked in Todmorden, West Yorkshire (1974–1975) and Hyde, Greater Manchester, practiced (1977-1998).

A sixth and final report in 2005 raised further suspicions about other deaths in his early career, and Dame Janet Smith, the judge who submitted the report, put the total number of his victims over that 27-year period at 250.

In January 2004, on the eve of his 58th birthday, Shipman was found hanged in his cell at Wakefield Prison.

His wife, Primrose Shipman, who pleaded her husband’s innocence after his conviction, received his full NHS pension, which she would not have been entitled to if Shipman had lived past 60.

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